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Marijuana News in Arizona and World

Warren Buffett Marijuana
Warren Buffett, the man who made billions from soda and candy, is now shifting his keen investment eye onto the marijuana industry.

Cubic Designs Incorporated, a subsidiary of Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway, is a business which optimizes warehouse floor space. They recently delivered roughly 1,000 fliers to marijuana dispensaries over the last month hoping to catch the attention of cultivators looking to maximize their grow space. The fliers read in large lettering: “Double your growing space” and “Grow your profits.”

Shannon Salcrecht, Cubic Designs Inc.’s marketing coordinator, realized the potential business opportunity after being contacted by a number of marijuana growers looking for information. Retail cultivation space has become sparse in places like Denver and Seattle, where growers are hoping to maximize their yield which in turn has caused landlords to raise the rent.

The hardest part for Cubic Designs has been trying to locate the actual growers since they don’t intentionally advertise their names or whereabouts. Salcrecht said, “The one thing with this industry that’s kind of tough is that it’s somewhat still secretive.”

Buffett amassed his fortune through acquiring large stakes in companies like Coca-Cola and Dairy Queen when the time was right. It only makes sense that he would get in on the thriving legal marijuana industry as it begins to develop.

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Marijuana Political Donations

US marijuana industry businesses are now profitable enough to become major political donors that support marijuana-friendly candidates and ballot questions.

Congress members who once politely returned the marijuana industry businesses’ contribution checks are now keeping them. Some new marijuana business political activities include fancy fundraisers at Four Seasons hotels and art auctions hosted at law firms.

“We’re developing an industry here from the ground up. If we don’t contribute politically and get out there with the candidates, we can’t help shape what happens,” said Patrick McManamon, of Cannasure Insurance Services, which provides insurance coverage to marijuana cultivation centers and dispensaries.

Medical marijuana businesses have been giving contributions to candidates since the late 90s, but with the start of recreational marijuana in Colorado and Washington, the industry and its political clout are expanding quickly.

Marijuana is currently legal for medical or recreational use in 23 states and Washington, D.C. New marijuana measures will be on November ballots in Alaska, Florida, Oregon, and Washington, D.C. Many contributions are being funneled at those upcoming campaigns and the candidates that support them.

The Marijuana Policy Project (MPP) is one of the largest marijuana advocacy contributors and is expected to donate around$150,000 to federal candidates in 2014, up from $110,000 in 2013. The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) and the Drug Policy Alliance also contribute directly to federal candidates. And tax-exempt marijuana industry groups such as the National Cannabis Industry Association (NCIA) can contribute an unlimited amount of untraceable money.

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Governor Brewer Marijuana
Governor Jan Brewer is softening her position on medical marijuana as well as for the right for terminally ill patients to choose to use drugs that are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Brewer’s newly-found empathetic stance for people with debilitating medical conditions has her changing her views towards the 2010 Arizona Medical Marijuana Act which allows patients with certain medical conditions to get a doctor’s recommendation to obtain marijuana from dispensaries for medical purposes.

“I’ve been reading a lot about it [marijuana research studies],” she stated. “And it certainly looks like it probably does help people.”

When asked about Proposition 303, the “right to use” measure, Brewer stated: “I think that if someone is facing life or death that they should be able to make that choice … and if they’re willing to take that risk … they ought to be able to do it”

Proposition 303 would allow drug companies to make available drugs and/or medical devices that are not yet approved by the FDA for people with a terminal illness. It would also protect doctors from being disciplined by regulatory boards because they agreed to prescribe a non-approved drug to a patient.

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Eric Holder Marijuana
As Attorney General Eric Holder prepares to resign from his post, he appears to be more open than ever towards the rescheduling of marijuana as a less dangerous, more beneficial substance.

In an interview, Holder stated, “I think it’s certainly a question we need to ask ourselves, whether or not marijuana is as serious of a drug as heroin. Especially given what we’ve seen recently with regard to heroin — the progression of people from using opioids to heroin use, the spread and the destruction that heroin has perpetrated all around our country. And to see by contrast, what the impact is of marijuana use. Now, it can be destructive if used in certain ways, but the question of whether or not they should be in the same category is something that we need to ask ourselves and use science as the basis for making that determination.”

Holder also stated that the Obama administration would be “more than glad” to work with Congress to re-examine how marijuana is scheduled. In April he said he’s “cautiously optimistic” about how the historic marijuana legalization movements in Colorado and Washington were working out.

The Obama administration, along with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and a few U.S. attorneys, raided hundreds of marijuana dispensaries that were compliant with state laws. But it was Holder, in 2013, who announced that the Department of Justice would let Colorado and Washington implement their new marijuana legalization laws.

Under the Controlled Substances Act, marijuana is classified as a Schedule I substance, as is LSD and heroin. According to the DEA, Schedule I substances have a “high potential for abuse” and “no currently accepted medical use.” Yet science has clearly indicated otherwise by proving that marijuana does help provide relief from a multitude of health ailments.

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Teen Marijuana Use Decline
Although marijuana legalization is quickly gaining momentum in the United States, statistics from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health reveal that teens between the ages of 12 and 17 are using less marijuana than they were a decade ago.

According to the statistics, teen alcohol and tobacco consumption has declined as well. This might signify a healthy lifestyle shift by our society.

The survey also noted that teenagers are finding it more challenging to get a hold of marijuana than a decade ago. This can lead to the conclusion that the legalization of marijuana for medicinal and recreational use has made marijuana less available to teens. It’s also likely that the legal and regulated marijuana industries, whether medicinal or recreational, are diminishing the marijuana black market leading to less marijuana being distributed on city streets.

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AZ Marijuana Legalization
A marijuana advocacy group attempting to make marijuana legal for adults in Arizona in 2016 has filed the necessary paperwork with state elections officials granting them permission to raise money to campaign for the initiative.

The Marijuana Policy Project of Arizona initiative will be based off of Colorado’s voter-approved recreational marijuana program that taxes and regulates marijuana for adults 21 years of age and older.

Andrew Myers, who is helping with the initiative, said the group will form a “diverse coalition” to assist with drafting the initiative’s language. He also stated that marijuana advocates are closely watching Colorado’s recreational marijuana program to determine what should and shouldn’t be replicated in Arizona. Colorado’s marijuana program allows a limited number of medical and recreational marijuana dispensaries to operate and has heavy oversight to regulate the industry.

The Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), which advocates to legalize and regulate marijuana, said it will pursue legalizing marijuana in Arizona in 2016 because such initiatives are more successful during presidential elections, which is when more voters visit the polls.

Over 50,000 Arizonans already have medical marijuana cards which allow them to legally purchase and use medical marijuana. Many more people are expected to become cardholders as more dispensaries open every month making access to medicine much more convenient.

As seen in Colorado and Washington, the legalization of marijuana can generate new marijuana jobs, tax revenue for public programs, social and health benefits, and more.

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Marijuana Legalization Signs

It may be an off-year election, but it’s a big one for drug policy reform. In seven weeks, voters across the country will have a chance to accelerate the unprecedented momentum to legalize marijuana and end the wider drug war. In fact, there are more drug policy reform questions on the ballot this November than ever in American history. Voter initiatives — primarily reforming or repealing marijuana laws — appear on the ballots in seven states, at least 17 municipalities and one U.S. territory. To help you keep score at home, here’s an overview, starting with the highest-profile measures.

Oregon: Passage of Measure 91 will make the Beaver State the third to legalize marijuana for adults outright. Like the historic laws adopted in Colorado and neighboring Washington two short years ago, this initiative would legalize possession of small amounts of marijuana for adults 21 and older and create a statewide system to regulate production and sales. And similar to Colorado’s law, Measure 91 would allow adults to cultivate small amounts of marijuana under controlled circumstances. In this entirely vote-by-mail election, the initiative has already been endorsed by the Pacific Northwest’s largest daily paper and would likely boost efforts across its southern border to end marijuana prohibition in California two years from now.

Alaska: The other statewide marijuana legalization initiative, Measure 2, is closely modeled on Colorado’s Amendment 64 and tracks many of the elements in Oregon’s prospective law. Alaska was something of a marijuana reform pioneer as possession and cultivation of small amounts for personal use in a private residence has been protected under the Alaska Constitution since the 1970s. Alongside Oregon in 1998, Alaska was among the first states to legalize medical marijuana. With a deep-rooted respect for personal freedom, Alaska would become the first red state to legalize marijuana for adult use, no doubt raising eyebrows across the political spectrum.

Florida: Amendment 2 is the only statewide medical marijuana initiative on the ballot this year, and it’s one to watch. Victory would make Florida, with its huge population and bell weather status in American politics, the very first southern state to adopt a medical marijuana law. With 23 other medical marijuana states and super-majority support nationally, passage of Amendment 2 would effectively settle any lingering questions on public acceptance of marijuana as medicine. It’s going to be a challenge, though, since Florida law requires 60% to pass a voter initiative. While polls indicate enormous support, casino mogul Sheldon Adelson contributed a few million dollars to stop it as Amendment 2 is associated with Charlie Crist’s comeback gubernatorial campaign. Adelson’s intervention has created the first well-funded opposition to a statewide marijuana reform campaign ever.

California: On the heels of reforming its harshest-in-the-nation Three Strikes law in 2012, Californians are now poised to refine six low-level, nonviolent offenses, including simple drug possession, from felonies to misdemeanors. Proposition 47 would then dedicate the savings — likely more than $1 billion a year — to schools, victim services, and mental health treatment. With retroactive sentencing and expungement provisions, the impact of Prop 47 in California on wasteful corrections spending and individual lives would be profound and surely resonate across the country.

District of Columbia: Earlier this year, the D.C. Council adopted the nation’s most far-reaching marijuana decriminalization law. In November, voters in the nation’s capital will decide whether to go even further. Initiative 71 makes it legal for adults over the age of 21 to possess and cultivate small amounts of marijuana. While District law prevents the ballot initiative from addressing the sale of marijuana, the D.C. Council is considering a bill that would tax and regulate marijuana within the District. D.C. has the highest per capita marijuana arrest rates in the U.S. with enormous racial disparities as police target African Americans for 91 percent of these arrests. Initiative 71 will be the first marijuana reform campaign fought primarily on the issue of the drug war’s ongoing toxic impact on black communities.

Other races: Voters in municipal elections from the Northeast to Micronesia will weigh in November 4 on a range of marijuana focused issues.

Guam: Voters could make this U.S. territory the first to adopt medical marijuana. The binding referendum would allow for dispensaries regulated by the Department of Public Health and Social Services.

Maine: By a wide margin in 2013, Portlanders chose to eliminate criminal penalties for adult possession of up to an ounce of marijuana. In seven weeks, voters in York, South Portland, and Lewiston will tackle the same question.

Michigan: In the last two years, residents of seven cities have voted to remove local penalties for adult possession of small amounts of marijuana in a private residence. As of now, a whopping 11 other cities (with apparently more to come) will have the chance to follow suit this year.

New Mexico: Last month, the City of Santa Fe became the first in the state to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana. On the ballot in November, voters in Bernalillo (Albuquerque) and Santa Fe Counties will decide if their county should affirm decriminalization efforts.

Public opinion has shifted dramatically over the last decade in favor of reforming marijuana laws and dismantling the egregious excesses of the drug war. And elected officials have begun to take notice. The U.S. House has voted five times in recent months to let states set their own marijuana policies while Senators Rand Paul and Cory Booker have introduced similar bi-partisan legislation in the U.S. Senate in addition to a cluster of other long-overdue criminal justice reforms. When the dust settles on November 5, the momentum for change in this country will only have accelerated.

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WA Marijuana Dispensary
It has been two months since the first recreational marijuana dispensaries opened their doors in Washington, and sales are skyrocketing, which has lead to an increase in tax revenue for the state.

According to Washington’s State Liquor Control Board, $12.1 million of legal recreational marijuana has been purchased since July 8, the opening day for licensed business. Total sales more than doubled in August to $6.9 million, up from $3.2 million in July. Monthly tax revenue increased from around $805,000 to $1.75 million.

September sales are on pace to be around $7.1 million, which would translate into $1.8 million in tax revenue.

The rapid sales growth is due to more dispensaries opening across the state. There were only 24 approved retail dispensaries in July when retail sales began, but that number has since increased to more than 50 dispensaries. More dispensaries are coming as officials grant additional licenses to some of the thousands of applicants.

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AZ Dispensary Marijuana
Republicans in the House of Representatives have passed legislation this week which addresses the right-wing media’s attempts to demean pro-marijuana programs through accusations that low-income Americans are using their government benefits in order to purchase marijuana.

There are currently two bills making their way through the Republican-heavy House which connects government assistance for low-income families with the legal purchase of marijuana. The Preserving Welfare For Needs Not Weed Act, which made its way to the House yesterday, hopes to stop the use of individuals using government granted cash cards provided by the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program in order to purchase marijuana from dispensaries. The No Welfare for Weed Act is a similar bill that was introduced by Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ), but instead hopes to ban the purchase of marijuana with food stamps (SNAP benefits).

These bills come as no surprise following the recent efforts by Fox News to blame impoverished Americans for using money from the government to purchase recreational marijuana. According to the National Review Online, “welfare beneficiaries withdrew thousands of dollars in public assistance cash from ATMs at weed shops” just after Colorado legalized recreational marijuana.

These are accusations that the conservatives have continued to push on the public. Republican Dave Reichert claimed, “We are seeing new abuses of these benefits. In these states, a person can walk into one of the newly opened pot shops and use their welfare benefit card to pay for pot…this isn’t an idle concern. Reports examining welfare transactions in Colorado revealed over $5,000 in welfare benefits were accessed in stores selling marijuana in the first month such stores were open.”

The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families blog has so far been unable to prove that any of this money has actually been used to purchase marijuana because many of the shops where the money was withdrawn sell products other than marijuana. Furthermore, many welfare recipients use marijuana as their medicine, so revoking their right to use their welfare money on marijuana is the same as stopping them from buying prescription drugs or herbal remedies.

Currently, Arizona’s medical marijuana program provides a 50% discount to SNAP recipients for their medical marijuana card and many Arizona dispensaries also provide SNAP discounts.

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NY Marijuana Legalization
New York state Senator Liz Krueger just revealed plans to introduce the Marijuana Regulation and Taxation Act in January which could very well lead to New York legalizing and taxing marijuana for adults as soon as 2015.

If the senator’s bill passes, it would allow retail marijuana stores to open under the supervision of the State Liquor Authority. Adults 21 years and older would in turn be allowed to possess two ounces of marijuana for personal use as well as to grow up to six plants in their home.

New York has been in the medical marijuana news recently for becoming the 23rd state in the US to legalize marijuana for medicinal purposes.

Krueger says that, “The real motivation for this bill comes from the fact that we have spent decades attempting to do prohibition and a war on drugs that has actually done nothing and is particularly ruining the lives of young people of color and having them go into the criminal justice system and come out with the kind of citations that limit their access to financial aid for college and exposes them to a criminal justice system that, frankly, I do not believe they should have been exposed to in the first place, for simply using a drug that is proved to be less dangerous than alcohol and tobacco. It is a win-win to decriminalize marijuana and regulate it and tax it.”

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